And yes, that last name is familiar. Barbara Rae-Venter is pioneering a new, high-stakes application of genomics — one that could put killers behind bars. Half a lifetime ago, she was married to the man who went on to become perhaps the best-known pioneer of the field

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But what are the limits?

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Scientists have engineered swine that pollute less, fend off disease, and produce more meat, but you won’t find them outside experimental farms . . . yet

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With such enormous bodies, elephants should be particularly prone to tumors. But an ancient gene in their DNA, somehow resurrected, seems to shield the animals

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He wants to give it away for free. A Harvard scientist thinks he’s reached a new milestone: a genetic test that help identify people who are at high risk of heart attacks. Can he convince doctors to use it?

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Inside the controversial world of epigenetics research

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Some fifteen years after the human genome was sequenced, researchers still can’t agree on how many genes it contains

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It seems impossible, right? We have been taught from the time we were young that babies are made when a sperm and an egg come together, and the DNA from these two cells combine to make a unique individual with half the DNA from the mother and half from the father. So how can there be a third person involved in this process?

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