And humans could be next. Biologist George Church says the idea is to live to 130 in the body of a 22-year-old

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A genomics startup co-founded by George Church emerged from stealth mode on Wednesday, proclaiming that blockchain, the technology that underlies transactions of cryptocurrencies such as bitcoin, will help people understand their genome, find cures for (unspecified) diseases, and, unlike most existing genomics companies, guarantee that individuals will retain permanent ownership of their DNA data

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More than 116,000 Americans are waiting to receive an organ transplant, and about 20 die each day during the wait. Scientists are eager to find solutions to the organ shortage

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Jeantine Lunshof insists she is not the “ethics police.” It says so on the door to her closet-sized office at Harvard. She doesn’t find reasons to reflexively shut down experiments. She doesn’t snoop around for deviations from ethical guidelines. But when scientists discuss their research in the twice-weekly lab meetings she attends, “I will say, hmm, that raises some good questions,” Lunshof said

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A few years ago, bringing back an extinct species was considered science fiction. That’s no longer the case. Developments in cloning and our ability to work with ancient DNA have made some scientists so confident that they claim to be on the brink of achieving the feat

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George Church recently spoke with JAMA about the human health implications of HGP-write. The following is an edited version of the interview

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Geneticist George Church has pioneered methods for sequencing and altering genomes. He has been called a founding father of synthetic biology, and is probably the world’s leading authority on efforts to resurrect the extinct woolly mammoth. Now, a battle over who owns the patent rights to a revolutionary gene-editing technique could hinge, in part, on whether Church’s scientific skill could be considered ‘ordinary’

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Research that uses powerful gene-editing techniques on human embryos needs to be restricted, scientists agree — but they are split over why

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