The new tools will likely open the doors for scientists to explore many novel areas. With comments from our Alan Regenberg

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The temptation to use these technologies to “enhance” ourselves or our children, or to edit out undesirable traits, will be enormous, writes Mildred Z Solomon

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On 10 June 2017, a sunny and hot Saturday in Shenzhen, China, two couples came to the Southern University of Science and Technology (SUSTech) to discuss whether they would participate in a medical experiment that no researcher had ever dared to conduct

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A bipartisan trio of senators on Monday introduced a resolution underscoring their opposition to the experiments last year in China that led to the birth of the world’s first genome-edited babies

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Host Bethany Brookshire leads a panel of three amazing guests to talk about the promise and perils of CRISPR, and what happens now that CRISPR babies have (maybe?) been born. Featuring science writer Tina Saey, molecular biologist Anne Simon, and bioethicist Alan Regenberg.

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The proposal follows a Chinese scientist who claimed to have created twins from edited embryos last year. Molecular biologist Denis Rebrikov has told Nature he is considering implanting gene-edited embryos into women, possibly before the end of the year if he can get approval by then

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Our Jeffrey Kahn joins panelists at a symposium cohosted by the Berman Institute and the New York Stem Cell Foundation with support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation. Watch now:

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A panel of government-appointed experts in Germany agreed unanimously that the human germline “is not inviolable,” rejecting one objection to using genome editing technologies such as CRISPR to make heritable changes in the DNA of human embryos, sperm, or eggs

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