Our Jeffrey Kahn joins panelists at a symposium cohosted by the Berman Institute and the New York Stem Cell Foundation with support from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation. Watch now:

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A panel of government-appointed experts in Germany agreed unanimously that the human germline “is not inviolable,” rejecting one objection to using genome editing technologies such as CRISPR to make heritable changes in the DNA of human embryos, sperm, or eggs

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Watch now: The NAM & CSIS Commission on Strengthening America’s Health Security hosted a conversation on whether human germline genome editing should be permitted, the types of applications which might be appropriate, the standards and criteria that should be followed, and what regulatory or governance framework is needed. Panel includes our Jeffrey Kahn

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Stanford is investigating Stephen Quake, a professor of biotechnology, because of his interaction with He Jiankui, the scientist behind the first gene-edited babies. “I hold myself to high ethical standards,” said Dr. Quake, who was once Dr. He’s academic adviser

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18 scientists from seven countries have called for “a global moratorium on all clinical uses of human germline editing” — that is, changing DNA in sperm, eggs, or early embryos to make genetically altered children. They say a moratorium should be in place for at least 5 years

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Experts, including our Jeffrey Kahn, weigh in on gene-editing technology

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He Jiankui deliberately sidestepped regulations, dodged oversight, and used fake ethical review documents in hopes of gaining “personal fame” for a worldwide first, according to preliminary results from a Chinese governmental investigation reported today

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Despite the appearance of agreement, scientists are not of the same mind about the ethics and governance of human germline editing. A careful review of public comments and published commentaries in top-tier science journals reveals marked differences in perspective

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