Dr. Leila Jamal is a clinical genetic counselor and bioethicist at Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. She joins KJZZ to discuss “Trump-care,” and concerns about what will happen with pre-existing conditions cloud the new plan’s future, while a new bill aiming to loosen the regulations laid out in GINA is being considered in Congress

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A bill is moving through Congress—the Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act—that would effectively allow businesses to require their employees to disclose lots of sensitive medical data, including their genetic information

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A little-noticed bill moving through Congress would allow companies to require employees to undergo genetic testing or risk paying a penalty of thousands of dollars, and would let employers see that genetic and other health information

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The situation, odd as it may sound, played out like this. Colman has genetic markers for cystic fibrosis, and kids with the inherited lung disease can’t be near each other because they’re vulnerable to contagious infections. Two siblings with cystic fibrosis also attended Colman’s middle school

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A US company is the first to face penalties under the Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA), a law that protects the privacy of genetic information. On 22 June, a federal court jury in Georgia awarded US$2.25 million to two men whose employer tested their DNA, seeking to identify who had repeatedly left feces in one of its warehouses

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A jury awarded a $2,225,000 verdict against a food storage company in federal court Monday afternoon, after the company was sued for violating the rights of two employees when it requested DNA samples to identify the mysterious individual leaving feces around its warehouse. The verdict included $225,000 and $250,000 in compensation for the two plaintiffs, and $1,750,000 in punitive damages

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A company’s use of DNA tests to investigate employee wrongdoing ran afoul of a genetic nondiscrimination act

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