If you take genes from another kind of plant, or bacteria, and insert them into a crop like soybeans, the result is considered a GMO. You need government approval to sell a new GMO. If you just take a snippet out of a gene without inserting anything new, though, the product falls into a gray area

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Tired of regulatory confusion and a lack of funding, some US researchers are taking their gene-edited livestock abroad

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Philip Loring writes that calls for strict science-based decision making on complex issues like GMOs and geoengineering can shortchange consideration of ethics and social impacts

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If we decide to use it. The debate over whether to use genetically modified mosquitoes to fight malaria, explained

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To feed the burgeoning human population, it is vital that the world figures out ways to boost food production. Increasing crop yields through conventional plant breeding is inefficient – the outcomes are unpredictable and it can take years to decades to create a new strain. On the other hand, powerful genetically modified plant technologies can quickly yield new plant varieties, but their adoption has been controversial

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In September, the U.S. Department of Agriculture gave the green light to a version of the plant Camelina sativa, an important oilseed crop that had been genetically engineered using CRISPR to produce enhanced omega-3 oil. What was interesting about this approval was that the USDA did not ask that the inventors of the plant endure the usual regulatory hoops required to sell biotech crops

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Here’s something that may sound like a contradiction in terms: low-fat pigs. But that’s exactly what Chinese scientists have created using new genetic engineering techniques

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The key to eliminating Zika? Since 2015, the U.S. and U.S. territories have reported 5,074 and 38,306 cases of Zika, respectively. The Zika virus is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes aegypti mosquito

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