America’s soaring drug prices are suddenly getting lots of attention. For that, you can thank Martin Shkreli, the much-loathed CEO of Turing Pharmaceuticals who recently raised the price of an anti-parasitic drug by 5,500 percent. Overnight, a single tablet went from $13.50 to $750, making an essential medicine unreachable for some

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What if, in addition to an ethical duty to do what we feel is best, we also had an ethical duty to recommend the most cost-effective care?

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The price of drugs is the U.S. public’s top health-care concern in opinion polls, and the 2016 presidential candidates are increasingly paying attention

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Federal and state Medicaid officials should widen access to prescription drugs that could cure tens of thousands of people with hepatitis C, including medications that can cost up to $1,000 a pill, health care experts have told the White House

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The tragic culmination of their encounter is not disputed: Mr. Stone drew his gun and shot Mr. Bird, leaving him paralyzed from the neck down. Mr. Bird’s insurance company declined to cover his medical bills. The reason? His injuries resulted from “illegal activity.” Yet Mr. Bird was not convicted of any crime in connection with the incident. He was not even charged.

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Editorial: Two reports published this month provide fresh evidence of the hard-to-justify high prices that many hospitals charge for common procedures. The prices drive up premiums for many privately insured patients and can be ruinously expensive for those who are uninsured or inadequately insured or who go to a hospital or doctor outside their insurance network

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All but one of the these facilities is owned by for-profit entities, and by far the largest number of hospitals — 20 — are in Florida

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Op-Ed: Money Is Time

November 11, 2011

Can you buy more time? Social justice and the film ‘In Time’

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