Carleigh Krubiner, a faculty member at Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, said, “Hopefully this will set a new precedent for ongoing and future Ebola vaccination efforts, avoiding costly delays in protocol approvals while women face the very real threats of Ebola infection.”

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After a motorcycle accident that almost took off his foot, Johns Hopkins bioethicist Travis Rieder became dependent on the pain medication he had been prescribed. Though he managed to wean himself off the drugs, the experience prompted him to write “In Pain: A Bioethicist’s Personal Struggle with Opioids.”

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When the musician Yoko Sen was hospitalized a few years ago, she could not help but hear the hospital’s many alarms as a musician. Consider a cardiac monitor that beeps in C, she said, along with a bed-fall alarm that emits a high-pitched whine

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Data from a federal program designed to compensate people harmed by vaccines shows how rare it is for someone to claim they were hurt after getting vaccinated

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The agency said two patients received donated stool that had not been screened for drug-resistant germs, leading it to halt clinical trials until researchers prove proper testing procedures are in place

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Across the nation, public health departments are redirecting scarce resources to try to control the spread of measles. Their success relies on shoe-leather detective work that is one of the great untold costs of the measles resurgence

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Federal prosecutors accused the company of illegally marketing its powerful fentanyl painkiller and of defrauding government health care programs

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“Sorry for late reply. We’ve been under nonstop air strikes today, and I’ve been with emergency patients all day.” I received that Skype message in response to a request to interview 32-year-old neurosurgeon Omar Ibrahim, originally from Egypt but based for the past five years in Syria and the last two in Idlib

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