Philadelphia could become the first U.S. city to offer opioid users a place to inject drugs under medical supervision. But lawyers for the Trump administration are trying to block the effort, citing a 1980s-era law known as “the crackhouse statute.”

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A bioethicist is sounding the alarm on it, based on his firsthand experience. In his new book “In Pain: A Bioethicist’s Personal Struggle with Opioids,” Travis Rieder, details his recovery after a motorcycle accident. Physicians prescribed him large doses of opioid painkillers. But when he wanted to taper off, those same physicians were of little help

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Some drug users say that as long as the lifesaving drug is around, they don’t worry as much about dying

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Hank Greely writes, When He Jiankui announced the birth of twin girls whose DNA he had modified … he justified his actions on the ground that he had given the two girls lifetime immunity from HIV infection. … Not only was He ethically wrong in doing this work, but its scientific basis was even weaker than generally recognized.

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James Toomey writes that the core argument—that unless Facebook’s suicide prediction algorithm is subject to the regulatory regime of medicine and operated on an opt-in basis it is morally problematic—is misguided and alarmist

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Every public library and YMCA in the U.S. may soon be equipped with Narcan, in an effort to combat drug-related deaths by expanding access to the opioid-overdose-reversing naloxone nasal spray

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McCance-Katz is setting up a “false dilemma” said Travis Rieder, a bioethicist at Johns Hopkins University. He pointed to evidence that people who use drugs are capable of making decisions to minimize risk to themselves

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Cities seeking to open sites where illegal drug users are monitored to prevent overdoses responded defiantly Tuesday to a Justice Department threat to take “swift and aggressive action” against that approach to the nationwide opioid epidemic

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