Many readers of this blog told us they were inspired by the first story in our series on #nostringscash aid — about a ground-breaking experiment in Kenya to test the benefits of giving poor people a steady stream of cash in place of traditional aid. But some questioned the ethics of studies like this

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Driven by fear of malpractice. Johns Hopkins research team conducts national survey of more than 2,000 physicians

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The editors suggest, “Science must acknowledge mistakes as it marks its past.”

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A year ago, Maine was one of the first states to set limits on opioid prescriptions. The goal in capping the dose of prescription painkillers a patient could get was to stem the flow of opioids that are fueling a nationwide epidemic of abuse

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Lu Spinney writes, “I’m standing in the acute neurosurgery ward of Innsbruck University Hospital. The senior consultant has asked me to tell him about my son Miles, who is lying motionless on the bed beside us.”

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The guideline, which was issued on 25 July, will take effect in February 2018. It comes in the wake of a tragedy in a French drug study last year that led to the death of one man and serious neurological damage in four others. But some say the revision isn’t going for enough

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Our Silvana Barone and Yoram Unguru write, “Euthanasia could be viewed as iatrogenic insofar as it results in an outcome (death) that some might consider inherently negative. However, this perspective fails to acknowledge that death, the outcome of euthanasia, is not an inadvertent or preventable complication but rather the goal of the medical intervention…”

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That’s dangerous. When the results of clinical trials aren’t made public, the consequences can be dangerous — and potentially deadly

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