Before spending the money, the foundation must reach “mutual agreement” with the NIH and its donors — including the NFL — on the “research concepts” that will be addressed, as well as on “timeline, budget, and specific milestones to accomplish the research,” according to a signed agreement obtained by STAT

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For over four years, scientists have been arguing over whether or not to do experiments that could make more dangerous forms of certain viruses — influenza, SARS, or MERS — that could potentially start a pandemic in people if those creations got out of the lab

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In the US, patients harmed during medical care have few avenues for redress. The Danes chose to forget about fault and focus on what’s fair

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To protect people participating in medical research, the federal government decades ago put in place strict rules on the conduct of human experiments. Now the Department of Health and Human Services is proposing a major revision of these regulations, known collectively as the Common Rule. It’s the first change proposed in nearly a quarter-century

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Well that’s ironic. As if to mark World Antiobiotic Awareness Week, antibiotic resistance just got a whole lot scarier. Resistance genes identified in China suggests we could soon see bacteria that are resistant to every known type of antibiotic, and these genes have already been found in bacteria infecting people

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In April, an influential group of scientists recommended that scientists hold off germline editing until the implications are better known. STAT asked experts, including our Debra Mathews, for their take. Here’s what they said.

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No benefit can be derived from trials which are either invisible or reported partially or selectively. To avoid this risk, a growing number of organisations have made efforts to allow access to clinical trial results in a detail hitherto unknown. Despite the growing international effort and a notable legislative effort in the EU, the US lags behind

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When Charles Thompson checked into the hospital one July morning in 2011, he expected a standard colonoscopy. He never anticipated how wrong things would go.

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