He Jiankui deliberately sidestepped regulations, dodged oversight, and used fake ethical review documents in hopes of gaining “personal fame” for a worldwide first, according to preliminary results from a Chinese governmental investigation reported today

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On the day after Thanksgiving 2018, Jennifer Doudna, whose research on bacterial immune systems led to the gene-editing technique known as CRISPR, received a startling email from the Chinese scientist He Jiankui. “Babies born,” read the subject line. (with comments from our Jeffrey Kahn)

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The Chinese scientist who shocked the world by announcing that twin girls had been born from embryos that he had created using genome editing has told two colleagues that, contrary to a flurry of reports that he is under house arrest and possibly even facing the death penalty, he is “actually doing quite well here.”

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When He Jiankui went missing back in early December, we suspected big trouble ahead for the rogue scientist, but as Sarah Knapton reports in the Telegraph, his predicament is even worse than we thought

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A scientist in China claimed to have created the world’s first gene-edited human beings. How should the US respond? Listen now

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News of a reckless experiment demonstrates the dangers. A response from the editorial board of Bloomberg News

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He Jiankui tried to publish a paper describing additional experiments that made heritable changes in the DNA of human embryos. But the paper was rejected by an international journal after outside scientists raised concerns about both its ethics and its scientific validity, STAT has learned

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