A fertility clinic in Dubai emailed He Jiankui on December 5 — just a week after he announced the births — asking if he could teach its clinicians “CRISPR gene editing for Embryology Lab Application.”

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The draft rules mean that anyone who manipulates human genes in adults or embryos is responsible for adverse outcomes

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The shocking announcement of genetically modified babies creates an opportunity to overhaul the nation’s science, argue Ruipeng Lei and colleagues

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Hank Greely writes, When He Jiankui announced the birth of twin girls whose DNA he had modified … he justified his actions on the ground that he had given the two girls lifetime immunity from HIV infection. … Not only was He ethically wrong in doing this work, but its scientific basis was even weaker than generally recognized.

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Stanford is investigating Stephen Quake, a professor of biotechnology, because of his interaction with He Jiankui, the scientist behind the first gene-edited babies. “I hold myself to high ethical standards,” said Dr. Quake, who was once Dr. He’s academic adviser

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18 scientists from seven countries have called for “a global moratorium on all clinical uses of human germline editing” — that is, changing DNA in sperm, eggs, or early embryos to make genetically altered children. They say a moratorium should be in place for at least 5 years

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A powerful new national medical ethics committee, which will approve all clinical trials involving high-risk biomedical technologies, is at the center of a regulatory shakeup Chinese authorities are planning in the aftermath of the widely condemned “CRISPR babies” experiment, STAT has learned

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Other sensitive topics in 2018 include a vaccine scandal and a physician jailed for criticizing traditional Chinese medicine

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