The whole point of health insurance is protection from financial ruin in case of catastrophic, costly health problems. But a recent survey of people facing such problems shows that it often fails in that basic function

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Kojo Namdi Show: Last year, more than 72,000 Americans died from drug overdoses. Now, schools in Maryland are bracing for the local impact. Some are stocking up on naloxone, a medication which is used to block the effects of opioids and prevent fatal overdoses. Guests include our Brendan Saloner, listen now

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And we are not prepared for it. A century ago, the Spanish flu killed more than 50 million people. The world is at risk of another pandemic of similar scale

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Some patients refuse to answer. Many doctors don’t ask. As the number of Americans with dementia rises, health professionals are grappling with when and how to pose the question: “Do you have guns at home?”

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When people living with HIV walk out of prison, they leave with up to a month’s worth of HIV medication in their pockets. What they don’t necessarily leave with is access to health care or the services that will keep them healthy in the long term

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A doctor explains how a new rule proposed by the Trump administration would force vulnerable people to make impossible decisions

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Elderly residents given intensive therapy in the last weeks of life jumped 65 percent, a study shows, raising questions about financial incentives

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And patients are the worse off. Ed Silverman writes, Seeking to recover from sensational marketing scandals, GlaxoSmithKline did something unexpected five years ago — the company promised it would no longer pay doctors to promote its medicines, which had been a long-standing industry practice

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