“At first it’s cool, and then you realize, I’m filling some drugs that are for some pretty serious health problems as well. And these are the people that are running the country,” Pharmacist Mike Kim said, listing treatments for conditions like diabetes and Alzheimer’s. “It makes you kind of sit back and say, ‘Wow, they’re making the highest laws of the land and they might not even remember what happened yesterday.’”

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If developed and used sensitively, artificial intelligence systems could go a long way to mitigating these inequalities by removing human bias. A careless approach, however, could make the situation worse

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Who Gets Health in Old Age?

September 20, 2017

Rich, White People. Access to insurance isn’t erasing race- and class-based health disparities

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Rising rates of chronic disease and deaths from violence can be curbed only if fighting is brought to an end, say researchers

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State-sanctioned efforts to keep the incarcerated from reproducing began in the early 20th century and continue today

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Brendan Saloner, at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, told FactCheck.org that “no single study is as good as looking at the full body of research.” And while not all studies have found health improvement related to insurance coverage, the “preponderance of studies, especially the well-done studies, find that gaining insurance coverage, especially for low-income people, improves health and reduces mortality risks.”

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Our Leonard Rubenstein. a lawyer who also directs a program on human rights, health and conflict at the Bloomberg School of Public Health. says there were a staggering number of assaults on health care facilities in 2016. Rubenstein is the editor of a new report called “Impunity Must End” about aggression against health facilities and health workers globally last year

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When Chris Ategeka was a boy of 7 in Uganda, his parents died of HIV/AIDS. And his brother, not yet 5, died of malaria. The problem, as he sees it, is that upon graduation from medical school on the African continent, newly minted health care workers are hired away for more money elsewhere, pulling the talent from developing countries to, as he says, “slightly developed countries and Western countries”

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