You’ve probably heard the story of Henrietta Lacks’ cells, which spawned more than 17,000 patents, a bestselling book and a made-for-TV movie starring Oprah. The cancer cells were harvested from Lacks’ cervix without her consent in 1951. According to Johns Hopkins, where doctors took the cells, the resulting “immortal” cell line, known as HeLa, has contributed to medical breakthroughs

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Johns Hopkins leaders sent a message to the JHU and Hopkins Medicine communities today about an upcoming HBO film, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. The film is based on the best-selling book about the life of a woman who was treated for cervical cancer at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in the 1950s

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Our director Ruth Faden on the recent agreement between the NIH and the Lacks family

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Our Ruth Faden discusses the NIH’s recent agreement with the Lacks family on Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast

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Reposted in light of today’s historic agreemnent between NIH and members of the Lacks Family: Our Debra Mathews comments on genetic research, participation, control, trust and HeLa cells

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Our Michelle Huckaby Lewis comments on ‘The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, the Sequel’ an op-ed by Rebecca Skloot

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