The drug, Mavyret, is the first to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration that can cure all six genetic types of hepatitis C in about two months in patients who haven’t previously been treated. Other approved drugs generally require 12 weeks to treat the disease and often aren’t effective for all types of hepatitis C

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In this town, carved into the Appalachian mountains, in a state beset by hepatitis C rates seven times the national average, Harvoni and other new hepatitis C drugs remain largely out of reach. Over the past year, only 3 percent of the state’s Medicaid beneficiaries with the disease received treatment

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Salvatore Chimenti already had advanced liver damage from the hepatitis C virus when he filed a lawsuit against the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections in the summer of 2015. He wanted access to new and expensive drugs that cure the virus in 90 percent or more of people who take them

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Request for life-saving anti-viral medication rejected on technicality. Judge finds Pennsylvania protocol for inmates out of line with constitution

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But will they work in humans? Scientists have discovered three existing drugs — used for cancer, hepatitis C and for parasitic infections — that they say appear promising against the Zika virus. The experiments were conducted only in lab-grown human cells in petri dishes, but the results were dramatic

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Corrections facilities are ground zero for treating hepatitis C — but at a cost

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Two Washington state insurers — Group Health Cooperative and BridgeSpan — are targeted in class-action lawsuits that claim the companies are unfairly rationing new drugs that can cure hepatitis C based on high cost, not medical need

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All told, 33 states spent more than $1 billion to treat the disease with Gilead Sciences’ Sovaldi, according to data released Tuesday by Sens. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, and Ron Wyden, D-Ore.

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