Part of a shameful medical history. In May 1951, a 35-year-old Boston woman who had been treated for years for ulcerative colitis and a variety of mental disorders — with little success — entered the Lahey Clinic in Burlington, Mass., to have a lobotomy

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Cranial surgery without modern anesthesia and antibiotics may sound like a death sentence. But trepanation—the act of drilling, cutting, or scraping a hole in the skull for medical reasons—was practiced for thousands of years from ancient Greece to pre-Columbian Peru

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Who is your emergency contact? The answer to that question, standard in every doctor’s office, has now been used to predict the role of genes in hundreds of conditions, from diabetes to high cholesterol

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Simon Baron-Cohen absorbs the grave revelations in a study on a paediatrician enmeshed in autism’s history

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Should a college expunge his name?

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50 Years of Success, Strategies for Improvement,

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A History of Loneliness

March 19, 2018

Is loneliness our modern malaise? Former U.S. Surgeon General Vivek Murthy says the most common pathology he saw during his years of service “was not heart disease or diabetes; it was loneliness.”

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The history of Warfarin is a surprisingly bloody one. Find out how this anticoagulant drug went from cow-killer to life-saver in this Nature Video animation

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