A new software algorithm decides which patients are most likely to become infected with the virus. But this is not like other risk calculators, some experts say

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“We can’t stop progress with words on paper,” Denis Rebrikov said, when asked about international efforts to ban such research. Rebrikov spoke about his plans, addressing the scientific arguments against his CCR5 target and specifics about his ultimate aims and the prospect of his controversial experiment moving forward

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The proposal follows a Chinese scientist who claimed to have created twins from edited embryos last year. Molecular biologist Denis Rebrikov has told Nature he is considering implanting gene-edited embryos into women, possibly before the end of the year if he can get approval by then

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Trials of vaccines and treatments have not included enough female participants. Now that scientists are exploring possible cures, the need to enroll women is greater than ever

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Hank Greely writes, When He Jiankui announced the birth of twin girls whose DNA he had modified … he justified his actions on the ground that he had given the two girls lifetime immunity from HIV infection. … Not only was He ethically wrong in doing this work, but its scientific basis was even weaker than generally recognized.

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Surgeons in Baltimore have performed what’s thought to be the world’s first kidney transplant from a living donor with HIV, a milestone for patients with the AIDS virus who need a new organ. If other donors with HIV come forward, it could free up space on the transplant waiting list for everyone

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Surgeon Henry Heimlich is best known for inventing a way to rescue choking victims, but a quarter-century ago, he was vilified for promoting a fringe treatment for AIDS & Lyme disease. Called malarial therapy, it involved injecting patients with the malaria-causing parasite, supposedly to stimulate their immune systems

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The latest and largest ever study presented last week at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections did show a modest benefit. But confusingly, there was almost no decline in infections in the study group where it was most expected

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