A $5,571 bill to sit in a waiting room, $238 eyedrops, and a $60 ibuprofen tell the story of how emergency room visits are squeezing patients

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The hospital, especially during the holidays, crystallizes an unavoidable truth: There’s simply no substitute for being there

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Are they taking up beds that could be used for vulnerable domestic patients or are they bringing money that could be used toward other programs?

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The nurse lay in a bathroom stall, a syringe in her hand and track marks on her arm. She died from an overdose of fentanyl, a potent painkiller meant for patients

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The scene is shadowy, and the background music foreboding. On the TV screen, a stream of beleaguered humans stand in an unending line. “If you’re waiting patiently for a liver transplant, it could cost you your life,” warns the narrator. One man pulls another out of the queue, signaling an escape. Both smile

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The nation’s hospitals have been merging at a rapid pace for a decade, forming powerful organizations that influence nearly every health care decision consumers make. The hospitals have argued that consolidation benefits consumers with cheaper prices from coordinated services and other savings

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Defibrillator paddles did not work during a patient’s heart transplant in January, and a backup set was not nearby. The transplant ultimately failed, and the patient died two months later. His case was featured in a May article

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The potential health and economic consequences of a trend associated with states that have turned down Medicaid expansion

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