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A fertility clinic in Dubai emailed He Jiankui on December 5 — just a week after he announced the births — asking if he could teach its clinicians “CRISPR gene editing for Embryology Lab Application.”

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The concern is largely ethical. The reality is that biologists probably couldn’t produce designer babies even if they wanted to

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“It’s easy to get on your high horse when you’re not in our position,” she said. “If editing an IVF embryo is the best option to mitigate the pain that a child would otherwise suffer, then give us the choice.”

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A registry could keep human gene editing aboveboard, David Baltimore says

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The international committee of 18 researchers and bioethicists, which met in Geneva, Switzerland, over the past 2 days, also agreed with the widespread consensus that it would be “irresponsible at this time for anyone to proceed with clinical applications of human germline genome editing.”

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To be successful as researchers, we must be able to think through the impacts of our work on society and speak up when necessary, says Natalie Kofler

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The world urgently needs better international oversight of “genome editing in human embryos for reproductive purposes,” says an editorial co-written by the heads of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, and the U.S. National Academy of Medicine

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