He Jiankui tried to publish a paper describing additional experiments that made heritable changes in the DNA of human embryos. But the paper was rejected by an international journal after outside scientists raised concerns about both its ethics and its scientific validity, STAT has learned

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Nature editors write, “The claims from He Jiankui that he has used gene editing to produce twin girls demand action. A new registry of research is a good start”

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The case for and against CRISPR IVF clinics opening in the US. With comments from our Jeffrey Kahn

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The email landed out of the blue. As Dr. Kiran Musunuru was scrolling through his inbox about a year ago, he found a message from a scientist identifying himself as a graduate student at Southern University of Science and Technology in China

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Paul Knoepfler writes, “The scientific community needs to take a firmer and clearer stance that making genetically modified babies is prohibited for the time being. A temporary moratorium specifically on implantation of gene-edited human embryos would achieve that with minimal risk of over-regulating research and no impact on in vitro research.”

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He Jiankui, who claims to have produced the world’s first genetically modified babies, faced critics at a Hong Kong conference. Article includes comments from our Jeffrey Kahn

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And the world snapped to attention. Using YouTube rather than an academic journal, He claimed that with the aid of CRISPR, he had helped create the world’s first babies — twin girls born a few weeks ago — whose genomes had been edited as embryos

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