Since its public launch 10 years ago, Twitter has been used as a social networking platform among friends, an instant messaging service for smartphone users and a promotional tool for corporations and politicians. But it’s also been an invaluable source of data for researchers and scientists – like myself – who want to study how humans feel and function within complex social systems

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Safety First

February 24, 2016

Nature Eds.: It is worrying that US government departments are unable to divulge basic data on research projects involving human subjects. Such data should be publicly available to ensure volunteers’ safety

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To protect people participating in medical research, the federal government decades ago put in place strict rules on the conduct of human experiments. Now the Department of Health and Human Services is proposing a major revision of these regulations, known collectively as the Common Rule. It’s the first change proposed in nearly a quarter-century

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How many people participate in research, how much is spent on it around the world, and how can we maximize its benefits?

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Dr. Wilson signed on to what was supposed to be one of the largest and most definitive studies of its kind. In exchange, he and other doctors would be paid $75 for every patient they enrolled and tracked

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Exclusive: Watchdogs shocked at ‘disconnect’ between doctors who oversaw interrogation and guidelines that gave CIA director power over medical ethics

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I, like Rudder, have conducted social experiments on unconsenting, unwitting people. But the experiments I run differ in very important ways from the unacceptable methods with which OKCupid ran its experiment

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Community consultation is the only way to study issues in emergency medicine. “If you require consent for all clinical studies you end up getting into a Catch-22 where you can never systematically learn about anything in an emergency setting,” said Nancy Kass, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. “A person having a heart attack cannot give consent.”

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