The depression drug esketamine, marketed as Spravato, appears to offer quick relief to people who are actively considering suicide

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For many reasons, parents and teachers may fail to intervene when they spot LGBTQ teens in trouble. Can Google help?

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The TV series is linked to a troubling jump in suicide rates among boys the month after its premiere

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Digital health apps, which let patients chat with doctors or health coaches or even receive likely medical diagnoses from a bot, are transforming modern health care. They are also — in practice — being used as suicide crisis hotlines

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James Toomey writes that the core argument—that unless Facebook’s suicide prediction algorithm is subject to the regulatory regime of medicine and operated on an opt-in basis it is morally problematic—is misguided and alarmist

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In recent years, doctors have found convincing evidence that low doses of ketamine, a drug used by doctors and veterinarians for its anesthetic properties and by sensation-seekers for its psychedelic effects, might represent an genuine advance in treating depression. A new study published in the American Journal of Psychiatry suggests that ketamine could also be effective as a fast-acting treatment to prevent suicide

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Facebook is expanding its artificial intelligence-based suicide prevention efforts. The company said today that it has plans to eventually monitor and respond to suicidal intent on Facebook “worldwide,” excluding the European Union

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Stacy Freedenthal: “My friends called it a boxcar, the tiny cream-colored duplex I rented in Austin 20 years ago, a long rectangle divided by doorways without doors. The oak floors were so old that the finish had long ago worn away. They were filthy. I mopped, but dirt stubbornly remained caked between the slats of wood”

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