Texas Tech recently announced it will no longer take race into account in admissions to its medical school—a move that might affect not only aspiring doctors, but many of their would-be patients as well

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Researchers from under-represented groups are making genomics more inclusive by working with communities that have been overlooked or abused

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Anne Drapkin Lyerly, a bioethicist and obstetrician, said that there is a deep-seated norm to leave pregnant women out of clinical trials, reinforced by policies that have classified them as “vulnerable” and institutional rules that have made it easier to avoid considering the ­potential risks and benefits altogether

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A quiet but revolutionary new nat’l health policy goes into effect this week, ushering in changes that could lead to important medical discoveries that benefit most Americans. One problem. Implementing the change will require that our country’s health researchers make some fundamental changes in how they do business

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Most moms take medications during pregnancy. There’s practically no research on their safety – with comments from our Ruth Faden

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Researchers have been too reticent to include pregnant women in clinical trials of vaccines, contends the working group behind the report. “Even for the vaccines we now recommend in pregnancy, pertussis and flu, the original trials did not include pregnant women,” says Carleigh Krubiner, a bioethicist at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics, who is part of the group, “This project is trying to be more proactive.”

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Pregnant women are classified as a ‘vulnerable’ group

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“Only less than 8 percent of enrollees are Hispanic, even though Hispanics comprise 17 percent of the population,” said Dr. Eliseo Pérez-Stable, director of NIH’s National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities

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