It seems like gloves, needles, painkillers and water should be standard stock in any hospital. But they’re not in Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe’s hopes for economic change after the November 2017 ouster of President Robert Mugabe, with the new President Emmerson Mnangagwa, have not been realized

Quick Read

“The cost of doing this research versus the cost of essentially denying women access to something that could be highly beneficial, there’s really no comparison.”, says our Carleigh Krubiner, coauthor of a recent report on maternal immunization

Quick Read

The rich tend to be in better health and fill fewer prescriptions over all, except for certain types of medications, an analysis finds

Quick Read

Cheap and simple medical devices could improve performance and lower health-care costs, but first they have to overcome deeply rooted biases. With comments from our Nancy Kass

Quick Read

12 patients who tried injections of stem cells were hospitalized with infections, according to a report in The New York Times that should cause patients concern. More important is that they should investigate stem cell treatments, for conditions such as cartilage injuries to their joints, before committing to one of these procedures

Quick Read

The federal government’s new rule requiring hospitals to post prices for their services is intended to allow patients to shop around and compare prices, a step toward price transparency that has generated praise and skepticism

Quick Read

Dhruv Khullar writes that in a health system riddled with inequity, we risk making dangerous biases automated and invisible.

Quick Read

Are the eligibility criteria used for hip and knee replacements color, income or sex blind? Perhaps not, says new work from Johns Hopkins. Study co-author, our Casey Humbyrd, MD, and her team found that those who met cutoff factors for surgery tended to have higher incomes, more education and be white

Quick Read