For many African countries and especially among poorer communities, when people die there is no trace in any official legal record or statistic. It is common for a person who lives in the city and falls terminally ill to return to their rural village to await their death. When they die they are buried without any legal or official documentation of the death specifying the cause

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Mosaic: The WHO wants to eliminate rabies in Asia by 2020. But how, when rabid dogs are running India ragged? Mary-Rose Abraham reports

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Peter Ubel: “(T)he transplant system in the US suffers from terrible geographic disparities. People needing liver transplants in Northern California wait more than six years on average for an organ to become available, versus only three months in places like Memphis Tennessee.”

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Residents of some neighborhoods in Baltimore have limited access to pharmacies and the medications and supplies that they provide

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State tests found more than 65,000 children in the city with dangerously high blood-lead levels from 1993 to 2013. Across the United States, more than half a million kids are poisoned by lead each year, and the majority come from cities like Baltimore

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Carlton Scott thinks the court should “leave it like it is. I mean, what are people going to do? Get sick, go to the hospital [and say], ‘I don’t have insurance. Won’t you please help me anyway?’ ” It just won’t happen, he says

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The Cost of Pure Water

April 14, 2015

Ghana has plenty of water. So why do its people buy plastic pouches from street vendors? Shaun Raviv investigates

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About 14 million Americans have gained health coverage since Obamacare’s insurance expansion began in 2014 — but those new enrollees haven’t swamped the nation’s doctors’ offices, new research shows

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