Immigrants living in the U.S. without legal permission are not eligible for most public benefits. However, if their children are born in the U.S., the children are eligible for benefits like Medicaid and food assistance programs that could help them stay healthy

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Shereese Hickson’s multiple sclerosis was flaring again. Spasms in her legs and other symptoms were getting worse. She could still walk and take care of her son six years after doctors diagnosed the disease, which attacks the central nervous system

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Nearly three years after a Zika outbreak in Brazil caused thousands of cases of microcephaly and other devastating birth defects in newborns, Reuters returned to check on the mothers and their children

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The whole point of health insurance is protection from financial ruin in case of catastrophic, costly health problems. But a recent survey of people facing such problems shows that it often fails in that basic function

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And we are not prepared for it. A century ago, the Spanish flu killed more than 50 million people. The world is at risk of another pandemic of similar scale

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When people living with HIV walk out of prison, they leave with up to a month’s worth of HIV medication in their pockets. What they don’t necessarily leave with is access to health care or the services that will keep them healthy in the long term

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A doctor explains how a new rule proposed by the Trump administration would force vulnerable people to make impossible decisions

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A person in the US can expect to live an average of 78.8 years. However, life expectancy varies widely across geography. A child born in Mississippi today could expect to never reach his or her 75th birthday. But a child born in California, Hawaii or New York could expect to reach their expect to live into the early 80s

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