Unplugged and Unmoored

September 16, 2016

Susan Gubar: I realized that I could do without the television and the landline, but the loss of the web was harrowing. I worried: How could I, as a cancer patient, manage to exist without internet access?

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Harding’s website Lab Scribbles is a test to see if this idea could work. There, Harding is publishing her lab notes on the structure of Huntington proteins in real time. She hopes the transparency will encourage others in the field to collaborate with her, correct her when she’s wrong, and, most importantly, help bring science up to the speed of the internet age

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David Bowie’s death produced an outpouring of grief around the Internet, and some people question its sincerity. But that’s what we do now. We grieve online as much as we do in person

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Web surveys of attitudes towards mental illness reveal the size of the problem — and offer a way to find fixes, says Neil Seeman

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These findings support some of the early hopes that MOOCs would provide a life-changing opportunity for those who are less advantaged and have limited access to education. Of course, MOOCs are still available only to people who have access to the internet, and completion rates remain low. However, there are now over 1 million people who have completed courses from Coursera alone

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Some countries’ demands for the erasure of search engine results on privacy grounds could soon affect even information available in the United States

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Houston firefighters have learned how to use a live video chat program, so they can consult with an emergency medicine doctor while out on 911 calls

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The ethical issues that come with crowdfunded healthcare. “If we use crowdsourcing for healthcare costs as a way to replace what a good healthcare system might do, then we’re really creating a new health disparity,” said Margaret Moon, a bioethicist and professor of pediatrics at Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics

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