“2019 is the year when the training wheels come off and the world gets to see what CRISPR can really do for the world in the most positive sense,” says Fyodor Urnov, a gene-editing scientist at the Altius Institute for Biomedical Sciences in Seattle and the University of California, Berkeley

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A procedure called mitochondrial replacement therapy could eliminate devastating diseases. It would not enable parents to ‘design’ their children

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Stanford is investigating Stephen Quake, a professor of biotechnology, because of his interaction with He Jiankui, the scientist behind the first gene-edited babies. “I hold myself to high ethical standards,” said Dr. Quake, who was once Dr. He’s academic adviser

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Critics are concerned about the explosion in controversial stem cell procedures offered by clinics—and, increasingly, respected hospitals

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This response, marked by cooperation and in-country capability, may be the model for the years ahead, as scientists from both Broad in the US and Nigeria believe the chances are high of emerging virus outbreaks occurring more frequently.

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So why can’t more women get it? We now know there’s a cheap, safe treatment that could save thousands of lives each year. But those who need it can’t always access it.

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Sea of Solitude, which Electronic Arts will publish this year, is among a growing number of video games that are tackling mental health issues

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Digital health apps, which let patients chat with doctors or health coaches or even receive likely medical diagnoses from a bot, are transforming modern health care. They are also — in practice — being used as suicide crisis hotlines

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