There can’t be many people in the UK who haven’t heard of Charlie Gard. He’s a little boy with mitochondrial disease who is on life support. His parents want to send him to the US for experimental treatment; the UK courts have ruled on medical advice that the treatment does not show sufficient promise. Medics think Charlie can’t be helped. His desperate parents claim otherwise, citing the support of 7 international doctors and a 350,000 strong petition

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The highly anticipated court hearing comes a day after Connie Yates and Chris Gard made a public appearance to state that their son “deserves a chance” to be taken to the United States for an experimental treatment that could potentially improve his condition

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If you were dying, surely you would grasp at any chance medicine might offer you. Recently, there has been a lot of effort at the state and federal levels to try to increase patient access to experimental drugs. The approach has been to cut the FDA out of what is known as “compassionate use”

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Lawmakers in Austin have approved a bill authorizing unapproved stem cell therapies, putting Texas on track to become the first state to explicitly recognize the experimental treatments

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Over the last 25 years, China, Ethiopia, the Maldive Islands, Peru, South Korea and Turkey had the greatest improvements in “deaths avoidable through health care at their economic level,” a complex but intriguing new measure of global mortality described last week in the Lancet

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Tomorrow, the UK Court of Appeal will review the controversial case of a British infant, Charlie Gard. Charlie’s parents are appealing a recent High Court decision that gave doctors permission to withdraw his life support. They have raised money for Charlie to travel to the US for an experimental medical treatment

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To the dismay of scientists. “It might give somebody like my wife a chance to walk,” Texas Representative Drew Springer said through tears late Thursday at the state Capitol in Austin. “I’d trade every one of my bills I’ve passed, every single one of them, to get the chance to hear HB 810.”

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How the Alberta government allowed a private foundation to offer an unproven ‘experimental’ health program to its citizens

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