Stem cell medicine has huge potential but unscrupulous clinics offering unrealistic hopes are endangering its future

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The health law professor’s never-ending quest to debunk too-good-to-be-true medical procedures, diets and revived ancient therapies has been turned into six-part documentary series titled A User’s Guide to Cheating Death

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Driven by fear of malpractice. Johns Hopkins research team conducts national survey of more than 2,000 physicians

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Brendan Saloner, who studies substance use treatment among young people at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Berman Institute of Bioethics, said the general lack of collegiate recovery options is symptomatic of a broader problem. “We don’t have the infrastructure set up to really help anyone in most places. It’s sort of a bleak world,” he said. “People are desperate, and understandably so.”

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Outbreaks of a deadly, sexually transmitted disease confound health officials, whose obstacles include drug shortages, uneducated doctors and gangs

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John Zhang, a New York fertility doctor, wanted to push the boundaries of science and fertility by giving women at risk of passing on serious genetic conditions a chance at healthy kids through an IVF technique that uses the DNA of three people

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When a receptionist hands out a form to fill out at a doctor’s office, the questions are usually about medical issues: What’s the visit for? Are you allergic to anything? Up to date on vaccines? But some health organizations are now asking much more general questions: Do you have trouble paying your bills? Do you feel safe at home? Do you have enough to eat?

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Stacey Lee, an assistant professor at JHU’s Carey Business School, suggests a more transparent process for patients

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