Findings from a new paper by our Mario Macis and colleagues. “This group is essentially saying, ‘I don’t like giving compensation to kidney donors, but if you tell me it can save a lot of lives, then I’m for it,'” says Macis

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Feeling grateful and able, I donated a kidney to a stranger. The only problem: I made the decision on my own

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What happens if you need a kidney transplant and don’t know a biological match? A Nobel prize-winning economist has a solution: transplant chains. Donors agree to give to a stranger in exchange for a kidney for their loved one, but it has to start with someone willing to give without getting anything in return

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Would you reject one from someone who died of a drug overdose?

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Some patients in desperate need of a kidney transplant participated in a bold experiment where they received organs infected with hepatitis C. The gamble paid off

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There are currently 96,559 candidates on the list awaiting a kidney transplant in the US. In major cities, the average wait is five to ten years. For those on the list, there are meager options to get off it. They could receive a kidney donation from a relative or a friend. Internationally, some have opted for a murkier route

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Seven-year-old Quinn Gerlach got a gift certificate from his grandpa a few years back — not for a toy, a book or a game. It was for a kidney

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“If I put myself on the list [for a kidney transplant] and just wait, that’s not proactive,” Okun said. “You get on the list and then do nothing, you might get a kidney and you might not get a kidney. And it’s [a wait of] anywhere from five to nine years.”

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