In a unanimous ruling, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that the law, approved by San Francisco voters in June 2015, is an unconstitutional infringement on commercial speech

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“It’s confusing. It’s confusing for even people like me who do this day in and day out,” Alison Bateman-House, a bioethicist at New York University who opposed the federal right-to-try law on the grounds that it would give patients false hope and could potentially lead to patient harm

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Five states — California, Oregon, Vermont, Washington and Colorado — allow the practice, and 20 have considered but not passed legislation to do so, according to the nonpartisan National Conference of State Legislatures. In Ohio, the practice remains illegal. With comments from our Joe Carrese

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A legal case involving a famous solitary elephant poses a fundamental question about animals’ rights

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The happy household of a onetime tabloid curiosity – with comments from our Jeffrey Kahn

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But are they ethical? Legal scholar Alison Dundes Renteln is aware that images of suffering are often part of human rights campaigns, and notes the value of freedom of expression. At the same time, she argues for ethical limitations on the right to take pictures

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An Ohio man who has the hepatitis C virus was sentenced to 18 months in prison on June 14 for spitting at Cleveland police and medics, according to a news report

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What began as a tete-a-tete about a community tennis center is now poised to potentially reshape how we think about who owns our DNA and the information it encodes.

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