Fifteen months ago in California, a surrogate mother gave birth to twin boys. The babies were the sons of a gay Italian couple who had used in vitro fertilization to have children. But when the two men returned to Milan with their newborns, a clerk at the registry office refused to transcribe the babies’ birth certificates, barring the men from registering the boys as their legal children

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A transformation of the delivery of health care may be an enduring legacy for the president, even as Republicans plan to repeal the Affordable Care Act

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Kathy L. Hudson, Ph.D., and Francis S. Collins, M.D., Ph.D.: The Cures Act, formally known as H.R. 34 or the 21st Century Cures Act,1 passed overwhelmingly in the U.S. House of Representatives and Senate in the waning days of the 114th Congress and was signed into law by President Barack Obama on December 13, 2016

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Reshma Ramachandran and our Zackary Berger voice concerns about the impact of the 21st Century Cures Act on the FDA should it become law

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“The view of the medical profession is so clear now,” said Leonard Rubenstein of the Berman Institute for Bioethics at Johns Hopkins University. “There is no ambiguity anymore about what the rules are.”

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Will Trump intervene? How will a Donald J. Trump administration handle these ethically delicate materials?

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Human rights groups have objected to the punishments, arguing that violence will not be stopped by violence. The Indonesian Doctors Association said administering chemical castration would violate its professional ethics and said its members should not take part

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Geneticist George Church has pioneered methods for sequencing and altering genomes. He has been called a founding father of synthetic biology, and is probably the world’s leading authority on efforts to resurrect the extinct woolly mammoth. Now, a battle over who owns the patent rights to a revolutionary gene-editing technique could hinge, in part, on whether Church’s scientific skill could be considered ‘ordinary’

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