Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab are working with Facebook to develop breakthrough brain-computer interface technologies

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No one really knows how the most advanced algorithms do what they do. That could be a problem

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Just as ancient Greeks fantasized about soaring flight, today’s imaginations dream of melding minds and machines as a remedy to the pesky problem of human mortality. Can the mind connect directly with artificial intelligence, robots and other minds through brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies to transcend our human limitations?

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Jennifer Booton: I tried biohacking: the use of tech implants to augment biology

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Artificial intelligence is one of those tech terms that seems to inevitably conjure up images (and jokes) of computer overlords running sci-fi dystopias — or, more recently, robots taking over human jobs

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That way, it’ll be moral

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A runaway trolley is approaching a fork in the tracks. If the trolley is allowed to run on its current track, a work crew of five will be killed. If the driver steers the train down the other branch, a lone worker will be killed. If you were driving this trolley what would you do? What would a computer or robot driving this trolley do? Autonomous systems are coming whether people like it or not. Will they be ethical?

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It may sound like a strange idea to do nothing unless the driver does something, but it neatly sidesteps the complexities of autonomous car ethics that are currently causing auto manufacturers, researchers and philosophers plenty of headaches

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