The “Jamaica study” has garnered more attention online than 99 percent of scientific research

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It’s launching their physicians into uncharted territory. Corner-store cannabidiol “scares the bejesus” out of Dr. Jacqueline French. French, a neurologist, tries to steer her patients away from sprinting to the neighborhood bodega to buy versions of the hemp derivative that’s better known as CBD

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“We weren’t happy when a billboard went up saying marijuana laws reduce overdose deaths,” said Brendan Saloner of Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics & Bloomberg School of Public Health. “That was very hard for us to rein in.”

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Denied

April 5, 2017

More than half the states in the country have legalized medical marijuana, but some hospitals still bar users from life-saving organ transplants. The policy nearly cost Riley Hancey his life

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The new study is perhaps the first to examine how medical marijuana laws affect public-health issues such as body weight, physical wellness and exercise. It comes at a time when many states are are trying to identify and understand the social and health impacts of marijuana legalization, which has now been enacted, in one form or another, in 23 states and the District of Columbia. With comments from our Brendan Saloner

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Advocates believe that legal use of marijuana as medical treatments has allowed many with intractable medical problems to receive a safe and effective therapy. Opponents argue that these benefits are overblown, and that advocates ignore the harms of marijuana. Mostly, opponents say that the real objective of medical marijuana is to make it easier for people to obtain it for recreational purposes

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