The Medicaid work requirement plan devised by Arkansas and approved by the Trump administration backfired because it caused thousands of poor adults to lose coverage without any evidence the target population gained jobs, a new study finds

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“It’s well known that Medicaid enrollees overall have higher burden of physical and mental health problems than the general population,” said study co-author Brendan Saloner of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore

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In Indiana, a local hospital system, Parkview Health, charged private insurance companies about quadruple what the federal Medicare program paid for the same care, according to a study of hospital prices in 25 states released on Thursday by the nonprofit RAND Corp

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“When people get signed up for Medicaid, it increases the likelihood that they will seek all types of medical care including more visits to primary care doctors, and even when patients are not explicitly seeking care for opioid addiction, the greater contact with the health system creates more opportunities…” said lead study author Brendan Saloner

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Coverage Denied

January 3, 2019

Medicaid patients suffer as layers of private companies profit. Marcela Villa isn’t a big name in health care — but she played a crucial role in the lives of thousands of Medicaid patients in California. Her official title: denial nurse

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The potential health and economic consequences of a trend associated with states that have turned down Medicaid expansion

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In fact, the study suggests that the Medicaid expansion may be a tool in the fight against the opioid crisis. With comments from study coauthor, our Brendan Saloner

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“Getting a Medicaid card has enabled a lot of people to get into doctors’ offices and get treatment for their addiction,” said lead researcher Brendan Saloner. He’s an assistant professor of health policy and management at Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and School of Public Health in Baltimore

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