A panel of government-appointed experts in Germany agreed unanimously that the human germline “is not inviolable,” rejecting one objection to using genome editing technologies such as CRISPR to make heritable changes in the DNA of human embryos, sperm, or eggs

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Three government institutions in China, including the nation’s science ministry, may have funded the “CRISPR babies” study that led to the birth last November of two genetically modified twin girls, according to documents reviewed by STAT

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One of the projects has already received funding from the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH’s) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) in Bethesda, Maryland, and will start in a few weeks; the other is awaiting funding

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“This is a beautifully elegant system that puts genes into plants, that causes negative effects. Why can’t we turn this system upside down, and use it to deliver positive traits into plants?” Bextine says

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If we decide to use it. The debate over whether to use genetically modified mosquitoes to fight malaria, explained

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“That constellation of features raises questions about what would happen and what could be done about it,” says Jeffrey Kahn, director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics

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Editing DNA may be par for the course in Chris Schramm’s genetics class at Waubonsie Valley High School, but so are discussions on the bioethics of that ability

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Stelarc, a 72-year-old Australian, has an ear on his arm. Soon he hopes to attach a small microphone to it so people can, via the internet, listen to whatever it hears

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