On Memorial Day, Americans remember those who died in service to the country. In the past 5 years, a large proportion of these deaths have been suicides. Popular media often link military suicide with PTSD. However, clinicians have identified an additional cluster of symptoms that are related to both military deployment and suicide risk but do not fit the criteria for PTSD. These symptoms fit with what has been called “moral injury.”

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Watch now (video). Diverse and innovative projects led by investigators from across the Johns Hopkins University explore contemporary ethical issues, from climate change to social justice.

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A collaborative initiative, led by our Cynda Rushton, offers recommendations to build moral resilience

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How can nurses show resilience in the face of moral distress? In August 2016, 45 nurse leaders, clinicians, researchers, ethicists, and key stakeholders convened to discuss that very question in a Symposium

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Nurses convened at Johns Hopkins for a two-day symposium organized and led by Cynda Rushton and the American Journal of Nursing

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Linda Aiken says she’s worried that hospitals think of nurses as a cost to be cut and not as a revenue stream. Cynda Rushton, a professor of nursing and bioethics at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and School of Nursing, agrees. “There is a mindset among some administrators that nurses are easily replaceable commodities — a nurse is a nurse is a nurse,” she says

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Swaddled in soft hospital blankets, Lexi is 2 weeks old and weighs 6 pounds. She’s been at Women and Infants Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island since she was born, and is experiencing symptoms of opioid withdrawal

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The Ethics of Moral Outrage

January 7, 2016

As Cynda Rushton has stated, we “should distinguish between moral outrage that is grounded in principled discernment and action from an impulsive, unreflected emotional reaction that lacks sufficient grounding in ethical values or standards.” Such an approach would go a long way toward recognizing true moral outrage and be more discerning and disciplined about our responses to it

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