A Call To Action Report

November 14, 2017

An ANA Panel has finalized the Call to Action: Exploring Moral Resilience Toward a Culture of Ethical Practice. Steering committee members include our Cynda Rushton, with additional contributions by our Heidi Holtz

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Join the National Academy of Medicine on July 14 in Washington, DC as it hosts the first meeting of the Action Collaborative on Clinician Well-Being and Resilience. This public meeting provides an opportunity for the public and invited experts, including our Cynda Rushton, to provide feedback on the direction of the collaborative, and will highlight research and examples of promising approaches to promoting well-being. Live webcast available

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A collaborative initiative, led by our Cynda Rushton, offers recommendations to build moral resilience

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How can nurses show resilience in the face of moral distress? In August 2016, 45 nurse leaders, clinicians, researchers, ethicists, and key stakeholders convened to discuss that very question in a Symposium

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Cynda Rushton’s research informs a new Berman Institute/School of Nursing program that arms nurses with skills to manage “moral distress”

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After nearly 30 years of research into moral distress there are no clear-cut answers for how to reduce its detrimental impact. In August, 46 nurse leaders convened at Johns Hopkins to address these challenges

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Linda Aiken says she’s worried that hospitals think of nurses as a cost to be cut and not as a revenue stream. Cynda Rushton, a professor of nursing and bioethics at the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and School of Nursing, agrees. “There is a mindset among some administrators that nurses are easily replaceable commodities — a nurse is a nurse is a nurse,” she says

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The Ethics of Moral Outrage

January 7, 2016

As Cynda Rushton has stated, we “should distinguish between moral outrage that is grounded in principled discernment and action from an impulsive, unreflected emotional reaction that lacks sufficient grounding in ethical values or standards.” Such an approach would go a long way toward recognizing true moral outrage and be more discerning and disciplined about our responses to it

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