After a Marine attacked an Iraqi restaurant in Portland, Ore., his family said he was provoked by trauma, not hate, and that he needed help, not jail time

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The brain damage was so severe that scientists all but gasped. Aaron Hernandez, the former New England Patriots tight end who was convicted of murder, killed himself in prison in April at age 27. An autopsy revealed that he had brain injuries akin to those seen in afflicted former players in their 60s, researchers announced on Thursday

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Aaron Hernandez, the former New England Patriots tight end and a convicted murderer, was 27 when he committed suicide in April. Yet a posthumous examination of his brain showed he had such a severe form of the degenerative brain disease C.T.E. that the damage was akin to that of players well into their 60s

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The discovery of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 1991, which permits non-invasive imaging of brain function, and the wide availability of scanners for research starting in about 2000 fueled claims that what we would learn about the brain and behavior would transform and perhaps revolutionize criminal law

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Michigan’s director of its Department of Health and Human Services, Nick Lyon, has been charged with involuntary manslaughter and misconduct in office over the Flint water crisis. Both are felonies in the state of Michigan

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Artificial intelligence is not just creeping into our personal lives and workplaces—it’s also beginning to appear in the doctor’s office. The prospect of being diagnosed by an AI might feel foreign and impersonal at first, but what if you were told that a robot physician was more likely to give you a correct diagnosis?

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A study published in Cell Biology on Feb. 18, titled “Coercion changes the sense of agency in the human brain,” suggests that this excuse isn’t just a pretext. People who’ve been ordered to do something bad to other people appear to genuinely experience a reduced sense of responsibility

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It may sound like a strange idea to do nothing unless the driver does something, but it neatly sidesteps the complexities of autonomous car ethics that are currently causing auto manufacturers, researchers and philosophers plenty of headaches

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