But many of us still get the basic facts wrong. This year marks the 100th anniversary of the great influenza pandemic of 1918. Between 50 and 100 million people are thought to have died, representing as much as 5 percent of the world’s population. Half a billion people were infected

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A new study ranks 20 wealthy countries on childhood deaths. The US comes in last.

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A statistical jump in the mortality rate of expectant and new mothers over 40 is “biologically implausible,” according to the co-author of a new study

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Not education. Not income. Not even being an expert on racial disparities in health care

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Pregnancy and childbirth are killing women at inexplicable rates. When it comes to the natural process of childbearing, women in the US die in much higher numbers than those in most developed nations, where maternal deaths are generally declining

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No one knows. Data collection on maternal deaths is so flawed and under-funded that the federal government no longer even publishes an official death rate

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The health of a nation’s economy and the health of its people are connected, but in some surprising ways. At times like these, when the economy is strong and unemployment is low, research has found that death rates rise

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Faiz Gani, Joseph Sakran and Joseph Canner of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine collected numbers representing more than 704,000 people who visited hospitals to treat gunshot wounds between 2006 and 2014

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