If we decide to use it. The debate over whether to use genetically modified mosquitoes to fight malaria, explained

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If residents agree to it. This small village of mud-brick homes in West Africa might seem the least likely place for an experiment at the frontier of biology. Yet scientists here are engaged in what could be the most promising, and perhaps one of the most frightening, biological experiments of our time

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A bacterium called Wolbachia could stop the bloodsucking insects from spreading diseases like Zika and dengue fever

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US Environmental Protection Agency will allow release of insects in 20 states and Washington DC

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Texas has launched aerial attacks on mosquitoes swarming coastal regions of the state and threatening to spread disease and hinder disaster recovery in the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey

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The US is sitting on one of the largest data sets on any animal group, but most of it is inaccessible and restricted to local agencies

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It sounds counterintuitive. But the plan is to release millions of sterile male mosquitoes, which will then mate with wild female mosquitoes. The eggs the females lay won’t hatch, researchers say

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For more than half a century, scientists have dreamed of harnessing an odd quirk of nature— “selfish genes,” which bypass the normal 50/50 laws of inheritance and force their way into offspring—to engineer entire species. But after all the hype, and fear of the technology’s misuse, scientists are now questioning whether gene drives will work at all

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