David Kroll writes, “In 1984, when I was a junior in college and my sister a junior in high school, my then-44-year-old mother was diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer. I would have done anything for her then, and continued to do so until she died on Dec. 9, 2017, in her bed at her home in Santa Fe, New Mexico, some 33 years after her initial diagnosis.”

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The mother, who was born without a uterus, received the transplant from a living donor last year at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, and had a baby boy there last month, the hospital said on Friday

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Womb transplants are again in the news as Richard Paulson, president of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), said there was no reason to believe that the treatment could not work for transgender women at recent conference in Texas

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No one knows. Data collection on maternal deaths is so flawed and under-funded that the federal government no longer even publishes an official death rate

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Carleigh Krubiner and Ruth Faden‚ from Johns Hopkins University in the US‚ said there was a desperate need to “protect women through research‚ not just from research”

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The widely accepted principle that mums-to-be are a ‘vulnerable’ group unfairly excludes them from taking part in clinical studies, and perpetuates the knowledge void around the impact of drugs taken during pregnancy, conclude researchers in the Journal of Medical Ethics. In a linked Commentary, Drs Carleigh Krubiner and Ruth Faden, of the Berman Institute, argue that the designation of pregnant women as ‘vulnerable’ “is inappropriate and disrespectful.”

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The U.S. has the worst rate of maternal deaths in the developed world, and 60 percent are preventable. The death of Lauren Bloomstein, a neonatal nurse, in the hospital where she worked illustrates a profound disparity: The health care system focuses on babies but often ignores their mothers

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Micaela Delgado is a beautiful dark-eyed baby girl with a ready smile. She’s eight months old. She’s one of more than 1,000 babies already born in Puerto Rico to mothers with Zika

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