Our own bodies. We’ve sent people to space for decades — but we’re only beginning to learn what that means for their health

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Scientists are still trying to figure out how the human body responds to long-duration spaceflight… In particular, a mission to Mars could require at least a three-year round trip that would take a toll both physically and psychologically

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Jessica Watkins, one of NASA’s newest recruits, says she’s ready—but only if there’s a ride back

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Unusual study of NASA’s Scott and Mark Kelly finds gene-expression shifts during nearly a year in space

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One year ago, six volunteers—an astrobiologist, a physicist, a pilot, an architect, a journalist, and a soil scientist — entered a 36-by-20 foot dome, located near a barren volcano in Hawaii, to simulate what living conditions would be like on Mars. Today they re-emerged from their year-long isolation

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The poet John Berryman once wrote, “My mother told me as a boy (repeatingly) ‘Ever to confess you’re bored means you have no inner resources.’ I conclude now I have no inner resources, because I am heavy bored.”

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Our 12-year-old daughter who, like us, is a big fan of The Martian by Andy Weir, said, “I can’t stand that people think we’re all going to live on Mars after we destroy our own planet. Even after we’ve made the Earth too hot and polluted for humans, it still won’t be as bad as Mars. At least there’s plenty of water here, and the atmosphere won’t make your head explode.”

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