Neuroethics as Outreach

September 12, 2017

Adina Roskies: “In this era in which “alternative facts” are allowed to bear that name, rather than their true name — which is “lies and misinformation” — and in which science is ignored, deemed irrelevant, or actively suppressed, I see a growing need for people in all the sciences and in ethics to speak out and to educate, wherever possible.”

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Imagination Is Ancient

September 11, 2017

Our imaginative life today has access to the pre-linguistic, ancestral mind: rich in imagery, emotions and associations

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Caffeine and smart phones might not strike most people as human enhancements, but in changing how we use our bodies and brains, they are exactly that. They improve our subjective wellbeing and facilitate our meeting day-to-day life goals

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Joseph Fins writes, “The last time I saw Margaret Worthen was in November 2012. She was in New York participating in a study of patients with severe brain injury. As soon as I walked into her room, I knew something had changed. She was still immobile, but she noticed my presence, was more attentive and engaged…”

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Don’t kill humans. Reuters reports that autonomous-car software must be “programmed to avoid injury or death of people at all cost.” It overcomes any further questions about whether one life is more important than another by adding that vehicles must be blind to the age, gender, or physical condition of people involved in any accident

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Our brains seem better at predictions than we are. A part of our brain becomes active when it knows something will be successfully crowdfunded, even if we consciously decide otherwise. If this finding stands up and works in other areas of life, neuroforecasting may lead to better voting polls or even predict changes in financial markets

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Bad Weekend?

August 21, 2017

How injecting a virus into the brain could wipe your memory

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A placebo-controlled study suggesting that cognition-enhancing drugs (CEs) can improve a chess player’s performance and a related survey indicating that nearly 10% of ranked German chess players have taken them during competition have thrown the spotlight once again on “smart pills,” their purported benefits, and uncharted dangers

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