People asked to choose between two written moral statements tend to glance more often towards the option they favour, experimental psychologists say. More surprisingly, the scientists also claim it’s possible to influence a moral choice: asking for an immediate decision as soon as someone happens to gaze at one statement primes them to choose that option

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Blocking the High

March 17, 2015

One man’s quixotic quest to cure addiction. If you could take the high out of drugs, what would be the point in taking them? Sujata Gupta meets the unorthodox doctor who thinks he can block some of the world’s most addictive pills.

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Parents’ traumatic experience may hamper their offspring’s ability to bounce back from trauma

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A new study finds that involuntary psychiatric treatment programs can keep people from cycling through ERs, jails, prisons, and homeless shelters—and therefore save taxpayers gobs of money. Is it worth it?

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But could someone use that information to make the brains of a nonhuman species more like us — to create the kind of super chimps that mocked humans in the Planet of the Apes? “One can never say never, but I think it’s a pretty long-shot, far-fetched type concern,” says Ruth Faden, director of the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics

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Paul Offit likes to tell a story about how his wife, pediatrician Bonnie Offit, was about to give a child a vaccination when the kid was struck by a seizure. Had she given the injection a minute sooner, Paul Offit says, it would surely have appeared as though the vaccine had caused the seizure and probably no study in the world would have convinced the parent otherwise

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For the past month and a half, Invisibilia has been exploring the invisible forces that shape our lives. Now they’re ending the pilot season with a visible twist — exploring the ways computers shape our behavior, and the way we see the world

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People Are Animals, Too

February 10, 2015

The human brain is special. Just not that special. To understand animal minds, and our own place in the living world, we should remove ourselves from centre stage, argues Peter Aldhous

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