Across the U.S., many doctors, nurses and other health care workers have remained silent about what is being called an epidemic of violence against them. The violent outbursts come from patients and patients’ families. And for years, it’s been considered part of the job

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Critical care nurses’ inner turmoil over others’ treatment decision can lead to higher turnover. Featuring comments from our Cynda Rushton

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On the 7th, 8th, and 9th of June 2016 a group of philosophers and bioethicists gathered at the Brocher Foundation in Geneva, Switzerland, to participate in a workshop on healthcare practitioners’ conscience and conscientious objection in healthcare

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Swaddled in soft hospital blankets, Lexi is 2 weeks old and weighs 6 pounds. She’s been at Women and Infants Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island since she was born, and is experiencing symptoms of opioid withdrawal

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“Nurses, like everyone else, have personal values,” adds Cynda Rushton, a Johns Hopkins professor of bioethics with appointments in the School of Nursing and the Berman Institute. “And sometimes those values are in conflict with what their patient may be asking them to do or participate in. Nurses have to find a way to reconcile their own moral values with the obligations of their profession.”

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Respect in the ICU

June 8, 2015

Beginning in 2012, Gail Geller, a professor in the School of Medicine with a history of addressing ethical questions, and several ethicists at the Berman Institute of Bioethics began examining issues of respect and dignity in ICUs. Their research was part of Project Emerge, an ongoing study by the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality at Johns Hopkins Medicine

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States with a shortage of doctors are giving nurse practitioners greater responsibilities and autonomy

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We tend to trust our computers a lot. Perhaps too much, as one hospital nurse learned the hard way

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