Doctors often use medicines ‘off-label’ to treat people with conditions that these drugs haven’t been tested on. Leah Shaffer explores how uncovering the secret life of antidepressants in particular could open up a host of new treatments

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A growing student population has been using them as “study” drugs – that help them stay up all night and concentrate. According to a 2007 National Institutes of Health (NIH) study, abuse of nonmedical prescription drugs among college students, such as ADHD meds, increased from 8.3 percent in 1996 to 14.6 percent in 2006

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Though you may not have realized it, there’s a good chance that a doctor has prescribed you a medication for a use other than what it was approved for. This off-label use is perfectly legal, but isn’t as safe as it might be, in part because incentives to invest in costly clinical trials to test such uses are weak

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In a move that may have broad ramifications for the pharmaceutical industry, a small drug maker called Amarin AMRN -6.57% has filed a lawsuit against the FDA to argue that its right to distribute information about unapproved uses of a medicine is protected by the First Amendment

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