Precarity, justice, and choice. The field of bioethics has worked hard to promote patient choice, especially in the context of end-of-life care

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More than half of older Americans lack the skills to gather and understand medical information. Providers must simplify, researchers say

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Most nursing homes had fewer nurses and caretaking staff than they had reported to the government for years, according to new federal data, bolstering the long-held suspicions of many families that staffing levels were often inadequate

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More than half of Americans take vitamin supplements, including 68 percent of those age 65 and older, according to a 2013 Gallup poll. Among older adults, 29 percent take four or more supplements of any kind, according to a Journal of Nutrition study published in 2017

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A Lesson on Life’s End

December 7, 2016

How one college class is rethinking doctor training. A new class at Columbia University envisions something different. The class, called Life at the End of Life, places students with medical aspirations — before they even apply to medical school — with patients at the Terence Cardinal Cooke Health Care Center (TCC), a nursing home in Harlem

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“For the horribly sick, hospitals are the worst place,” Dr. Thomas Cornwell says. Remember when doctors made house calls? While only a relative handful of doctors still offer them, there is growing evidence that comprehensive home medical care could be a viable alternative to the attendant woes and soaring expenses of institutional health services, particularly for those in late retirement

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