Shortages of “supportive care” drugs, for chemotherapy-induced nausea or to protect the kidneys, can delay cancer treatments, said Yoram Unguru, a pediatric oncologist & bioethicist at Sinai and the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics. When he gets the hospital’s list of shortages, “I scream, I shout, I shake my head”

Quick Read

Our Yoram Unguru writes, “Having cancer is hard enough without unnecessary and preventable impediments such as drug shortages, which represent a particularly vexing challenge. In the United States, shortages of drugs for cancer and other diseases over the past decade have become the new normal and the problem is getting worse.”

Quick Read

Be the first to like. Like Unlike

Quick Read

A look at why some families dealing with serious illnesses are having to put treatment on hold over prescription drug shortages – with comments from our Yoram Unguru

Quick Read

Bob Field was set to kick off his second course of BCG — a potent immunotherapy that treats his fast-growing bladder cancer. Instead, the New York City banking executive got a call from his urologist’s office, canceling that week’s appointment

Quick Read

Listening to the experience of my roommate in the cancer ward was like a kind of sonar, an echo bouncing back to me from my own future path, hinting at what’s to come

Quick Read

As a pediatric hematologist-oncologist, our Yoram Unguru, MD, has had his share of heart-wrenching conversations. “But one of the hardest is sitting down with a patient and family and telling them there’s a drug that’s part of the curative regimen, but it’s not available because there’s a shortage”

Quick Read

Yoram Unguru, MD, MS, MA at the Herman & Walter Samuelson Children’s Hospital at Sinai in Baltimore, Maryland, and Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics sees firsthand how drug shortages can increase medication errors, delay lifesaving treatments, and lead to patient deaths

Quick Read